Over 1,000 public witnesses in 47 states

A Feb. 16 Family Unity Prayer Vigil at Methodist Community Center in Arlington, Texas, also included a march for immigrant rights. This was one of more than 1,000 United Methodist public witnesses for immigration reform since 2009 that are documented in a "Immigration Reform Grassroots Journal" by the General Board of Church & Society.
A Feb. 16 Family Unity Prayer Vigil at Methodist Community Center in Arlington, Texas, also included a march for immigrant rights. This was one of more than 1,000 United Methodist public witnesses for immigration reform since 2009 that are documented in a “Imigration Reform Grassroots Journal” by the General Board of Church & Society.

The United Methodist Church has had a formal ministry of hospitality to immigrants based in local churches since 1999. This ministry, Justice For Our Neighbors, strives to create an environment of safe haven and hospitality within which immigrant newcomers and long-term citizens may come to know one another as neighbors in God’s household. In the past years the additional importance of comprehensive immigration reform has come to light.  And United Methodists have responded! The General Board of Church & Society. In almost every state individuals and small groups have taken grassroot efforts to promote genuine reform. The General Board of Church & Society discusses their actions, which  range

from visiting members of Congress both in their home districts and in
Washington, D.C., to prayer vigils, from marching at rallies to
approving resolutions at annual conferences calling for reform, from
protesting unjust laws to hosting DREAM (Development of Relief &
Education for Alien Minors) Sabbath events.

“The 1,050 public witness events over the past four years reported in
this journal bear evidence that this is not a movement driven by paid
organizers or an infusion of outside funding,” said Bill Mefford, GBCS
director of Civil & Human Rights…this is a movement driven by sheer passion and love for our immigrant sisters and brothers. This is a movement rooted in incarnational
relationships among immigrant communities.”